Archive for April, 2011

Got Furniture? – Chumkriel Language School, Kampot

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Chumkriel Language School in Kampot needs any furniture that is not
being used. We have just had a new building donated by Rotary clubs of
Dubbo, but now need the furniture for the children so if you have any
chairs, tables, desks, computer tables or shelving for the librar, they
would be greatly appreciated

Please contact me!

Thank You
Nget Sothy,
Director of Chumkriel Language School
Email
clskampot@gmail.com
Phone Number 089256400

IN CONVERSATION 02 WITH ARTIST AMY LEE SANFORD

Monday, April 18th, 2011

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: SA SA BASSAC <info@sasabassac.com>

Date: Mon, Apr 18, 2011 at 2:42 PM
Subject: IN CONVERSATION 02 WITH ARTIST AMY LEE SANFORD
To: SA SA BASSAC <info@sasabassac.com>

IN
CONVERSATION 02

WITH ARTIST AMY LEE SANFORD

THURSDAY 21 6:30-8:00PM

(ENGLISH + KHMER)

SA
SA BASSAC

#18 2nd Floor, Sothearos Blvd. (see map)

+855 (0)77 374 110

info@sasabassac.com

Please join us for an evening of conversation with
artist Amy Lee Sanford (née Ly Sundari), a Cambodian-American artist working
primarily in mixed media sculpture and installation. Her work frequently
addresses the evolution of emotional stagnation, and the lasting psychological
effects of war, including aspects of guilt, loss, alienation, and displacement.

At Brown University, Amy studied art, science, and
engineering. She furthered her studies at The Rhode Island School of Design,
University of Massachusetts/Dartmouth and Harvard University. While in Boston,
MA, she started up an artisan company, where she designed and fabricated handmade,
tessellated, porcelain tiles and mosaics for residential and commercial
interiors. She has exhibited in London, New York, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, Boston,
MA, Providence RI, Long Beach CA. She currently resides in Phnom Penh, and is
working on a new body of work.

Art Auction To Raise Money for Japan – Tonight 8PM

Monday, April 4th, 2011

ART AUCTION TO RAISE MONEY FOR JAPAN

With over 50 works of art from emerging and established artists!

The art community in Cambodia rallies together to support the people

of Japan in their time of crisis. All profits will be donated to the

Japanese Embassy who will distribute the funds where most needed.

ART AUCTION

FCC Cambodia (riverfront, Phnom Penh)

From 8pm Monday, April 4th, 2011

Supported by Phare Ponleu Selpak, FCC Cambodia and JavaArts
 

SA SA BASSAC opens Remember, a solo exhibition by Yim Maline on 7 April at 6:00pm

Friday, April 1st, 2011

———- Forwarded message ———-
From: SA SA BASSAC <info@sasabassac.com>

Date: Fri, Apr 1, 2011 at 3:05 PM
Subject: SA SA BASSAC opens Remember, a solo exhibition by Yim Maline on 7 April at 6:00pm
To: SA SA BASSAC <info@sasabassac.com>




SA SA
BASSAC is pleased to announce Remember, a solo exhibition by Yim Maline.
Remember presents four achromatic interpretations of the artist’s
childhood memories, in which the playful and the unsettling coincide.

 

Maline’s rigorous practice
spans media and scrutinizes the complexities of freedom. Growing up after the
official fall of the Khmer Rouge, Maline’s childhood years are considered
politically “free”. While she remembers laughing and playing – innocent actions
restricted just years before her birth – she notes the contraction of being
surrounded by ongoing violence, utter poverty and the dilapidation of social
infrastructure.

In
her essay What is Freedom?, Hannah Arendt writes: “The experiences of
inner freedom are derivative in that they always presuppose a retreat from the
world, where freedom was denied, into an inwardness to which no other has
access.“ Maline reconciles her past through the inwardness of imagination, by
calling something into being which did not exist before. She states, “War is
difficult. We want to be free but we don’t know if it will be granted to us.
Being an artist allows me to grant my own freedom; if there is something I
don't like in reality, I can re-imagine it in my work, and remain playful and
curious like a child.”

Maline turns her family’s poor dinette into an eerie
playground. Dinette (2010) is a sprawling floor installation of dirt
scattered with three hand-built, unglazed ceramic objects in series: knives,
bowls, and bones. The knives only seem sharp and the bowls are rendered useless
- punctured by the artist’s aggressive hands and echoing detonated cluster bomb
shells. The bone shape is taken from “dolls” the artist created as a child
using leaves of a k’plaugh tree. New Face (2010) is a collection
of eight rough plaster masks attached to the wall. The artist cast pieces of a face
repeatedly, after which she anarchically pieced together the parts to reflect
the disjointed nature of life during and after war.

The
centerpiece of the exhibition is a four-meter-long sculpture of a kite entitled
Hope (2010). Kite-making and flying survived decades of cultural
censorship during the Khmer Rouge. Maline remembers flying kites, especially at
the end of the monsoon season and the beginning of the dry season – a time filled
with hope for a rice harvest. Among the large-scale kites is the Khleng Ek.
Commonly flown at night, the Khleng Ek is unique for the haunting sounds from
the ek – a curved bamboo rod at the head of the kite. In the artist’s
adaptation, the customary kite is built of ceramic rather than the typical
light and durable materials of silk or paper. Hope defies one’s
expectations of a vibrant and celebratory recreational object. Heavy, black and
silent, Hope’s fragile, ceramic tails rests on the floor, its flight a
mere illusion.

Scar 1-4 (2010-2011) is
a series of large, meticulous graphite-on-paper drawings in which the artist
has imagined explosions of organically shaped rice clusters. She says, “In
Cambodia, like most of Asia, we work for rice; our bodies are built of rice.”
An explosion indicates a necessary release of pressure. The peculiar explosions
in Scar are symbolic of a time to
open, to travel, to learn. The title however is a reminder of something that
never goes away.

 

About the Artist

Yim
Maline was born in Battambang in 1982 and is currently based in Siem Reap. She
studied art at Phare Ponleu Selapak, Cambodia (1995-2003), and received her
Diplôme
National Arts Plastique (DNAP) from École Supérieure des Beaux-arts, Caen la
mer, France (2010). She has participated in numerous exhibitions in France and
Cambodia. Remember is Yim Maline’s
first solo exhibition.

About SA
SA BASSAC

SA SA BASSAC is a gallery and resource
center dedicated to creating, facilitating, producing, and sharing contemporary
visual culture in and from Cambodia.

Exhibition
Details

Exhibition:
            Remember by Yim Maline

Opening:
              7 April, 6:00-8:00PM

Dates:                  
7 April – 8 May, 2011

Opening
hours:     Thu-Fri 2-6pm / Sat-Sun
10am-6pm

Location:
              SA SA BASSAC #18 2nd
Floor, Sothearos Blvd, Phnom Penh

Web:
                    www.sasabassac.com

Contact

Erin
Gleeson, Artistic Director, SA SA BASSAC

+855
(0)12 507 917

erin@sasabassac.com



 

House Sunday April 03

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Ever wondered how you’ll get your news in the future?

Find out by watching the highly-praised documentary “For Neda”

The Overseas Press Club of Cambodia presents:

“For Neda”, a film by Antony Thomas

On
June 29, 2009, Neda Agha Soltan was shot and killed on the streets of
Tehran during the protests that followed the Iranian presidential
contest. Recorded on mobile phones, images of her dying moments appeared
on computer screens within hours across the world via social media
sites YouTube and Twitter. Iranian opposition groups broadcast the video
via YouTube and Twitter to rally support around the globe. The
documentary touches on Neda’s life and the events that lead to her death
along with the efforts of social media activists to get the message
out.

Though unsuccessful, the protests which were dubbed “The
Twitter Revolution” by journalists was the first major world event
broadcast worldwide almost exclusively via social media.

After the screening, the OPCC will host a panel discussion on social media and it’s growing impact on journalism.

The panel consists of

  • Laura Snook, editor of the Southeast Asia Globe.
  • Tharum Bun, freelance journalist and blogger.

META HOUSE
#37 Sothearos Blvd
Sunday April 3 2011
7:00 PM

Free admittance
Cash bar