Archive for November, 2012

Registration Open for CLX 2013

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Hey swingers!

Just a head’s up…catch the Early Bird!  Registration for CLX 2013 is officially open!
www.theclx.com

Click to let us know you’re coming on FB, thanks!
Join the group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/271927192819849/
Join the event: http://www.facebook.com/events/416752858379151/ (this helps with promotion!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


SWING AMOK! 
Visit us online: www.pppswings.com
Join us on FB: http://www.facebook.com/groups/188262761765/

Khmer Architecture Tours Sunday 25 November 2012

Tuesday, November 20th, 2012

Khmer Architecture Tours

Started in 2003 as an independent, not-for-profit organisation, the aim of KA Tours is to promote the understanding of modern architecture in Cambodia. 

Tours of modern architecture in Cambodia

Our tours focus on buildings erected after Cambodia’s independence in 1953, described as ‘New Khmer Architecture’, while setting these in the historical context of Phnom Penh.

Sunday 25 November 2012

1960s houses and villas in Phnom Penh (Toul Kork)
This tour visits three locations:
• The well-known ’100 Houses’ development, designed by Vann Molyvann and commissioned in the 1965 by the National Bank of Cambodia for its staff; these 100 or so identical houses are a thoughtful reinterpretation of the traditional Khmer house – some are still (just) in their original state.
• A Doctors’ House: A remarkable villa of the same period which has an exuberant, three-storey high entrance hall which dominates the design; now a Health Centre.

• The Double Stair House: A family villa – a rich blend of materials, form, light and air which creates a delightful residence – built to keep cool on the hottest of days.

We meet at the Post Office and travel by bus. Start at 8.30am, end around 11.30am.
Cost: $4 Cambodians, $9 Others. Children over 12 are welcome. 

For more information on upcoming tours, including our cyclo tour (Dec 9) and tour of Olympic Stadium (Dec 23) visit our website: www.ka-tours.org

Private tours also available.

For all bookings: contact@ka-tours.org

Opening ‘No Name’ by Yim Maline | Thursday 15 November, 5:30-7.30pm

Wednesday, November 14th, 2012

SA SA BASSAC is pleased to present No Name, our second solo exhibition with Yim Maline.

No Name is held in collaboration with the Cambodian Youth Arts Festival 2012 and curated by Vuth Lyno.

Until now, Yim Maline’s practice has activated memories specific to her childhood growing up amidst civil war. Using fantasy to reconstruct fragility, her ambitious and skillful use of materials challenges our perception, while an inherent vein of uncertainty and tension challenges our comfort. From her meticulous graphite-on-paper drawings to her intricate sculptures in clay or lace, Yim asks us to adjust.

No Name extends these qualities through video and sound, and turns to the here and now. Newly a mother, Yim considers the conditions in which she will raise her daughter, especially as we together face the assertive and destructive force of nature. In No Name, Yim calls for a conscious consideration of interconnectivity, pairing universal symbols of birth and life in a cycle of ‘natural’ destruction and controlled regeneration.

Entering the gallery, No Name is like a minimal island-universe. Dependent on time and space, the installation is in a constant state of flux. At its center is a suspended frozen disk of milk, onto which a looped video is projected: the image is an egg burning until annihilation, like a micro big bang. The otherwise empty gallery space is filled with the sound of searing flames and explosion, while a second channel of sound is activated by the heat of the projection which forces the milk to melt. As the milk drips away onto a black and mirrored acoustic platform below, a troubling drum is layered into the space, a heartbeat that quickens over the hours until it stops completely. As a new disk is installed, the process repeats.

The work is named No Name, and as such lacks a specific identity or fixed referent: Yim’s cosmology is emphatically cyclic and belongs to us all. A literal transformation of matter through a repetitive process embodied in a series of interacting circular forms, Yim’s installation invites the audience to circumnavigate it. The work is as acute as it is mysterious.

About the artist

Yim Maline was born in 1982 in Battambang, and is a graduate of Phare Ponleu Selpak art school (2003). She holds a BFA in Fine Art, École Supérieure des Beaux-arts de Caen la Mer, France (2010). Yim’s group exhibitions include Seven at Hotel de la Paix Arts Lounge, Siem Reap (2012) and currently Dom-near Thmey at Cambodian Living Arts, Phnom Penh. Yim’s solo exhibitions include Silk Threads at Insider Gallery, InterContinental Hotel, Phnom Penh (2012) and Remember at SA SA BASSAC (2011).

Exhibition Details

Exhibition: No Name by Yim Maline

Opening: Thursday 15 November, 5.30 – 7.30pm

Dates: 15 November – 18 November, 10am – 6pm

Artist Talk: Saturday 17 November, 10am (Khmer + English)

Location: SA SA BASSAC #182E Sothearos Blvd. Phnom Penh

Web: www.sasabassac.com

‘Living Well’ while ‘Doing Good’? (Missing) debates on altruism and professionalism in aid work

Tuesday, November 13th, 2012

It is part of a special issue of Third World Quarterly on ‘The personal and the professional in aid work’.

There is a free download here:

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09700161.2012.698133

Abstract

This paper takes at its starting point public criticism of international aid workers who appear to be ‘doing well out of poverty’. Based on fieldwork in Cambodia, the paper suggests that such public perceptions are mirrored by some aid workers’ uncertainties about the moral dimensions of their own and others’ lifestyles. Significantly, analyses of such public and private unease are largely absent from development ethics, even though comparable professions, such as nursing or social work, having produced substantial work on these issues. I argue that the scarcity of equivalent studies in development studies is partly the result of a tendency to foreground the ‘other’—the world’s poor—while rendering those who deliver aid invisible. Placing ‘aid recipients’ and ‘aid givers’ in separate categories, together with an emphasis on collective rather than individual moral responsibilities, not only makes it difficult to conduct open debates on the role of altruism and professionalism among aid workers, but also indicates how practices of ‘othering’ continue to inform aspects of development theory and practice.


HSEPP – Human Sciences Encounters in Phnom Penh –

email: hs.encounters@gmail.com
French web site: www.rencontres-shs-cambodge.ird.fr/
English web site:  http://www.shs-encounters-cambodia.ird.fr/
Networks :
http://rupp.academia.edu/HUMANSCIENCESENCOUNTERSINPHNOMPENHCAMBODIAHSECambodia
http://www.facebook.com/Humansciencesencountersinphnomphenh

Coordinating team:
Sapho Briand with
Pascale Hancart Petitet, Emiko Stock, Léo Mariani, Gabriel Fauveaud

Contemporary Visual Art in Cambodia and Viet Nam

Monday, November 12th, 2012

Cambodia and Viet Nam are both societies in rapid transition. Artists wrestle with the shocks of modernization as well as the traumas of history. This seminar explores the possibilities of research on current topics, including the intersection of society and the arts.

How can you effectively combine field-based work with object-based research?
This seminar examines two approaches: 1) ethnography and 2) visual studies/ art history. Ethnography’s oral history interviews and participant observation complement art history’s attention to close readings of artwork.

The first part of the seminar will be present case studies, including artists, international art exhibitions, and brief presentations by select artist-organizers. The second part of the seminar focuses on interdisciplinary frameworks. Related hands-on topics include ethical ethnographic practices, the politics of positionality and translation, and the publication process.

Việt Lê is an artist, writer, and curator. His work deals with popular visual culture, historical trauma, and modernity in Southeast Asia and its diasporas, particularly Việt Nam and Cambodia. Lê has been published in Crab Orchard Review; Fuse; Amerasia Journal; Asia Art Archive; Newsweek Asia; and the anthologies Writing from the Perfume River; Strange Cargo; The Spaces Between Us; Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art; among others. Lê’s artwork has been featured at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; DoBaeBacSa Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Cape Museum of Fine Arts, MA, USA; 1a Space, Hong Kong; among other venues. Lê has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Fulbright-Hays, William Joiner Center, Fine Arts Work Center, Center for Khmer Studies, and PEN Center USA.

Lê curated Miss Saigon with the Wind (Highways, Santa Monica) and Charlie Don’t Surf! (Centre A, Vancouver, BC); and co-curated humor us (Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, LA, CA), and transPOP: Korea Việt Nam Remix (Seoul, Sài Gòn, Irvine, San Francisco) and the 2012 Kuandu Biennale (Taipei). He has co-edited special issues of BOL Journal (Việt Nam and Us, 2008) and Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service Learning, and Community Literacy (Syracuse University Press, 2008). Lê received his MFA from the University of California, Irvine, where he has also taught Studio Art and Visual Culture courses. He received his doctorate from the University of Southern California. Lê is an Assistant Professor in Visual Studies and Visual and Critical Studies at California College of the Arts, San Francisco.

Việt Lê is an artist, writer, and curator. His work deals with popular visual culture, historical trauma, and modernity in Southeast Asia and its diasporas, particularly Việt Nam and Cambodia. Lê has been published in Crab Orchard Review; Fuse; Amerasia Journal; Asia Art Archive; Newsweek Asia; and the anthologies Writing from the Perfume River; Strange Cargo; The Spaces Between Us; Modern and Contemporary Southeast Asian Art; among others. Lê’s artwork has been featured at The Banff Centre, Alberta, Canada; DoBaeBacSa Gallery, Seoul, Korea; Cape Museum of Fine Arts, MA, USA; 1a Space, Hong Kong; among other venues. Lê has received fellowships from the Civitella Ranieri Foundation, Fulbright-Hays, William Joiner Center, Fine Arts Work Center, Center for Khmer Studies, and PEN Center USA.

Lê curated Miss Saigon with the Wind (Highways, Santa Monica) and Charlie Don’t Surf! (Centre A, Vancouver, BC); and co-curated humor us (Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery, LA, CA), and transPOP: Korea Việt Nam Remix (Seoul, Sài Gòn, Irvine, San Francisco) and the 2012 Kuandu Biennale (Taipei). He has co-edited special issues of BOL Journal (Việt Nam and Us, 2008) and Reflections: A Journal of Writing, Service Learning, and Community Literacy (Syracuse University Press, 2008). Lê received his MFA from the University of California, Irvine, where he has also taught Studio Art and Visual Culture courses. He received his doctorate from the University of Southern California. Lê is an Assistant Professor in Visual Studies and Visual and Critical Studies at California College of the Arts, San Francisco.

Contemporary Visual Art in Cambodia and Viet Nam